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WeatherTalk: The world's hottest temperature is not known

But the hottest measured temperature is 134 degrees.

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FARGO — The hottest weather on Earth is something of an unknown. Temperatures can only be measured in places that have thermometers, and thermometers are not located everywhere. The hottest temperature recorded by the meteorological community on Earth is the 134 degree reading from Death Valley, California, recorded July 10, 1913. This record is under suspicion, however.

Contemporary analysis of nearby weather stations recorded less than extraordinarily hot weather that day. If the 134-degree record is disallowed, the world record will become 130 degrees, also recorded at Death Valley on Aug. 16, 2020.

The Death Valley weather station is located in a notoriously hot spot on Earth, but it might not be the hottest. A few locations is Ethiopia and Iran are likely as hot or hotter, but these locations do not have calibrated weather measuring stations.

Related Topics: WEATHER
John Wheeler is Chief Meteorologist for WDAY, a position he has had since May of 1985. Wheeler grew up in the South, in Louisiana and Alabama, and cites his family's move to the Midwest as important to developing his fascination with weather and climate. Wheeler lived in Wisconsin and Iowa as a teenager. He attended Iowa State University and achieved a B.S. degree in Meteorology in 1984. Wheeler worked about a year at WOI-TV in central Iowa before moving to Fargo and WDAY..
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