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VAULT - HISTORICAL

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Famed frontier lawman Seth Bullock established first hotel in historic mining town
A look into some of the personalities that created the legend of Deadwood, one of the Wild West's most infamous towns.
Where did Al Capone and other mobsters hunker down in in the Upper Midwest? Who was 'Creepy' Karpis? What happened in the Bohn kidnapping? All these stories and more in Best of The Vault 2022.
Few are aware of how active vigilantes were in 1880s Dakota Territory. Ron Berget's book, "Montana Stranglers in Dakota Territory," tells a largely forgotten story.

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The only known flyer from the doomed show in Minnesota became the most expensive concert poster sold at auction. Buddy Holly and several other musicians died on their way to the show in 1959.
Author and archivist Jeffrey Sauve has delved into the curious and difficult case that stumped Duluth detectives for years.
Exclusive
Haskell Bohn, heir to a refrigeration fortune, lay face down on the ground as his kidnappers drove away into a dark summer night, in Minnesota, 1932, according to a police transcript exclusively obtained recently by Forum News Service. He had been ransomed. It was the end of Bohn's ordeal. His captors wouldn't get away with their crime.
Prohibition-era runners brought thousands of gallons of booze into the area, and despite law enforcements raids and arrests, there was plenty of demand for 'the devil's water.'
Exclusive
Haskell Bohn, kidnapped for ransom in St. Paul in 1932 because he was heir to a refrigeration fortune, struck up an unlikely 'friendship' with his Sankey Gang captors, talking baseball and bull riding, according to police records exclusively obtained from a descendent by Forum News Service.
The mystery of who robbed a Wahpeton bank in September 1932, endured until the man bragged about it 40 years later. He was 'Public Enemy No. 1' and 'the scourge of the Midwest.'

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The son of Minnesota manufacturing millionaire, Haskell Bohn appeared to be a flashy guy. Unfortunately for the Bohn family in St. Paul, Bohn's flash caught the attention of the Sankey Gang, a notorious criminal organization housed out of neighboring Minneapolis.
“Waterville friends of the murderer said he could drop five quail with as many shots, and the unarmed wardens had no chance at all," said a contemporaneous newspaper account of the encounter.
Built deep within a wooded area on the outskirts of Duluth, the topography of the area was thought to be optimal for housing — and hiding away — patients who had contracted tuberculosis.

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