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SEVERE WEATHER

Hail as large as 4.5 inches, or grapefruit-sized, reportedly fell in Wall, closely rivaled by four-inch hail in Belle Fourche. Wind speeds reached as high as 91 mph near St. Onge, while roughly 2.5 inches of rain fell in Midland.
Due to the lethal nature of heat on all-important corn pollination, temperatures reaching triple digits in some parts of the state have farmers worried. However, a combination of later planting this year and manageable temperatures at night leave some room for optimism.
The U.S. Department of Agriculture on Wednesday, July 20, 2022, changed the formula for disaster payments for above-normal livestock losses to reflect truer values of baby calves and other animals, in the wake of the April 2022 “Blizzard Haley” storm complex that hit North Dakota. The previous administration had administratively in 2020 added a "bottom-tier" of payment for baby calves that undervalued the animals.
The National Weather Service has issued a hazardous weather condition advisory spanning across South Dakota due to unusually high temperatures this week.

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“We’ve got quite a bit of damage out there,” said Doug Durfee, athletic director for McCook Central School. Durfee is also helping manage the state VFW baseball tournament.
Data from the National Centers for Environmental Information shows that in recent years, billion-dollar disasters are occurring at a more frequent pace.
Have additional storm reports you’d like included? Send them to dailynews@mitchellrepublic.com.
The National Weather Service placed Mitchell, as well as areas to the north and east, at moderate risk of severe storms, the fourth highest of five risk categories.
Earlier this month, Gov. Noem cited over $6.7 million in damage to 20 South Dakota counties and two reservations.
Building survived Mother’s Day tornado in 2015

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With the full extent of damage still unknown, Sholly said it’s unclear when the park may reopen.
Cattle producers who lost calves in the April 2022 snow storms -- especially in western North Dakota where drought or dry conditions persist -- say the government's Livestock Indemnity Program needs update its funding formula and rules if partial compensation will be relevant.
A series of April blizzards created a “long tail” of cattle illnesses, including pneumonia and scours. Losses range from zero to hundreds of calves, on top of record-setting drought and low feed and forage supplies. The numbers hide some of the effects — the loss in value when either a calf or a cow is lost, leaving orphans. 

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