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COVID-19 VACCINE

Latest Headlines
Since Paxlovid became available seven months ago, it has eclipsed other available therapies created to forestall life-threatening COVID symptoms in high-risk patients. Some doctors are quick to prescribe it, but as with so much about the COVID pandemic, there is controversy. Some patients are concerned about a possible rebound of the disease, while others have difficulty convincing their doctors they are good candidates for the drug.
Cases in the United States are up more than 25% in the last month, according to CDC data, as the rapidly spreading BA.5 subvariant has taken hold.
The vaccines for the youngest of kids are expected to be rolled out as early as June 21, the Biden administration said earlier this month.
A small county in Tennessee for much of the past year has reported the highest COVID-19 vaccination rate in Tennessee and one of the highest in the South. If only it were true. The rate in Meigs County was artificially inflated by a data error that distorted most of Tennessee’s county-level vaccination rates by attributing tens of thousands of doses to the wrong counties, according to a KHN review of Tennessee’s vaccination data. When the Tennessee Department of Health quietly corrected the error last month, county rates shifted overnight, and Meigs County’s rate of fully vaccinated people dropped from 65% to 43%, which is below the state average and middling in the rural South.
For most of us, COVID deaths, like the new cases, the hospitalizations and so on, are numbers on a chart, unless they affect us personally.
Active cases fell 1,835 to 488 over the week, health officials said. The 10 deaths among COVID-19 cases raised the state's death toll to 2,893.

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There are 43 people hospitalized with COVID-19 in South Dakota, state health officials reported March 30. That's the lowest total since Aug. 4.
For individuals forgoing vaccination, the risks can include layoffs and ineligibility to collect unemployment, higher insurance premiums, or loss of academic scholarships. For employers, vaccine hesitancy can contribute to short-staffed workplaces.
Active COVID-19 cases in South Dakota dropped to a low not seen since Aug. 20, according to the South Dakota Department of Health.

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