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Greenway, Page setting examples for kids off the gridiron

SIOUX FALLS -- Alan Page and Chad Greenway are both well-known for their accomplishments playing in the NFL with the Minnesota Vikings. On Friday at the Hy-Vee/Sanford Legends kids football camp, the duo hoped people -- especially kids -- recogni...

SIOUX FALLS - Alan Page and Chad Greenway are both well-known for their accomplishments playing in the NFL with the Minnesota Vikings.

On Friday at the Hy-Vee/Sanford Legends kids football camp, the duo hoped people - especially kids - recognize the importance of setting a high standard off the field, as well.

Greenway, a Mount Vernon native, made his 10th appearance at the Hy-Vee/Sanford Legends banquet on Thursday and three times has been named the Vikings Community Man of the Year (2011, 2014 and 2015).

Page, 70, played in the NFL from 1967 to 1981 and was key member of the Vikings' four Super Bowl appearances, graduated with a law degree, and in 1993, was named an associate justice of the Minnesota Supreme Court. He retired from the court in 2015.

Both Greenway and Page said football can be used as a tool to help teach life lessons, and that's what the Legends football camp is all about.

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"Life's about building relationships and working toward common goals, and that's what the ultimate team game of football is about," Greenway said. "I love opportunities sports create."

Page, who admitted he wanted to be a lawyer when he was a kid, added there is plenty to learn from football.

"Life goes on after football is over and not only that, it goes on while you are playing football and before you start playing football," Page said. "You need to have healthy development and kids need to understand that."

Page added he was getting to know Greenway a little more on Friday and said he was "impressed" by the former first-round pick.

"He's a great example for kids," Page said. "His hard work, his dedication and he has an intellect. He's an ideal model for kids."

Greenway, who has participated in the Legends football camp with the likes of Michael Irvin and Terrell Davis, said he hoped kids would understand how great of person Page was.

"(Former Indiana University basketball coach) Bobby Knight said it best. (Page) is the best motivation for any kid that you can possibly have," said Greenway, who joked he won't be attending law school after his NFL career like Page. "Alan has an amazing, accomplished career. The things he's done is incredible."

Greenway added he's proud to come back year-after-year for the Legends program, which allows more than 2,500 kids to attend free sports clinics and has a goal to teach the positive benefits kids can learn from sports.

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"I just love what they do with this Legends program and for the kids," Greenway said. "The type of celebrities and legends that they bring in is such a great opportunity for these kids. It's something I never got as a kid and it's fun to be a part of."

The former Iowa Hawkeye added he enjoys getting on the field with kids, after all the promotion and fanfare subsides.

"Once we get down to the nitty gritty and get on the field with the kids, it's a lot of fun," Greenway said. "It's fun to run around and learn the game of football. Kids get to learn the fundamentals and the basics."

Page added he believes success in athletics should go hand-in-hand with academics and stewardship.

"We often see these conflict between athletics, academics and being a good citizen," Page said. "That doesn't have to be. To really reap the benefits of athletics, the best way to do that is to be a good citizen, to be a good student and when all of that comes together, it puts you in a position to have successes that you probably couldn't imagine."

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