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WILDLIFE

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Bison that lived 3,000 years ago were 37% larger than those living today because of a warming climate — a trend that will accelerate, with bison projected to become 46% smaller by the end of the century. Bison are shaggy sentinels of climate change on the prairie.
Bald eagle populations have quadrupled since 2007, and are no longer endangered. Harvesting them or their feathers and eggs, however, still remains a federal crime.
The bill would provide money to states and tribes to recover troubled species
You too can use social media and other erroneous sources to research the history behind some of the unusual names in nature.

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Hundreds of geese, ducks and eagles have perished already as migration moves north.
Phone calls and tips from friends and strangers lead Granite Falls couple on journeys around the state and other states for the sake of that perfect picture.
Toxic lead from hunters' ammunition is impacting eagle population, researchers say.
A federal judge ruled the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service moved wrongly to remove wolves from the federal endangered list.
Gilligan, the juvenile loon who was stranded on a lake in the Crow Wing Lake chain near Nevis in early December when much of the lake iced over, was seen flying away from Dec. 19 by two people who were ice fishing in the area where Gilligan had been sighted.
Slocum Taxidermy opened in 1995; has grown to include customers throughout Midwest, including Scheels.

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Bryan and Bryce Sombke, who promote a 500-acre natural bird hunting and gun dog enterprise near Conde, South Dakota, and help on the family’s 2,000-acre farm, were among those hit in an unusual Aug. 28, 2021, hail storm. The storm brought high winds and softball-sized hail, and killed deer and decimated the bird population, as well as flattening 7- to 8-foot-tall corn and Conservation Reserve Program lands.
Bryan and Bryce Sombke, who promote a 500-acre natural bird hunting and gun dog enterprise near Conde, South Dakota, and help on the family’s 2,000-acre farm, were among those hit in an unusual Aug. 28, 2021, hail storm. The storm brought high winds and softball-sized hail, and killed deer and decimated the bird population, as well as flattening 7- to 8-foot-tall corn and Conservation Reserve Program lands.
Wisconsin DNR naturalist Ryan Brady travels across northern Wisconsin looking after some of the state’s lesser-known and definitely lesser-seen creatures.

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