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OUTDOORS ISSUES

Black bears live in the forests throughout the Itasca State Park area and normally avoid people. But when humans leave out food sources with enticing odors, such as bird feeders, unsecured garbage cans or remnants of campfire cooking and picnics, bears will come.
In this episode of the Northland Outdoors Podcast, Ryan Saulsbury, a science instructor and outdoorsman, joins host Chad Koel to talk about ticks.
Since the bounty program kicked off in 2019 as part of Gov. Kristi Noem’s Second Century Initiative, 136,683 nest predators have been removed, excluding the first month of this season.
If not for the efforts of The Nature Conservancy and the Minnesota Prairie Chicken Society, there might not be prairie chickens left in the state. Their numbers dwindled to a concerning level by the mid-1980s, their habitat ruined by the plow. They are now confined to remnant and restored grasslands in a few counties. One of those is Clay County, close enough to Fargo-Moorhead that before the sun rises over the prairie the lights of the metro glow brightly in the west.

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Latest Headlines
As soon as the snow melts, blacklegged ticks and others carrying serious diseases are out looking for your blood. Don't give it to them.
Nobles County puts fundraising efforts into land acquisitions.
Game and Fish Department and more than a dozen partners spearhead program to preserve, re-establish vital native prairie
A recent trip to Colvill Park in Red Wing left Post-Bulletin Outdoors columnist John Weiss wondering how birds handle the bitterly cold Minnesota winters.
The changes follow a wildlife-section reorganization that began about three years ago by DNR managers whose intent was to align the section's staffing, fleet and other expenses with available money.
Lawndale Creek restoration project helps clean water in Buffalo River while providing trout habitat in unlikely place

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Invading parasite decimated fish populations until a chemical poison was developed to kill their larvae.
Finding suggests population could act as a reservoir for viral mutation; uncertain whether deer can reinfect humans
Growth rates show interest, but there’s work to be done.

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