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BIRDS

Previous policy limited only birds from avian influenza hotspots.
Our late spring is a challenge for migrating birds and frustrating for us, but it's not without its drama.
The Cornell Lab of Ornithology offers the Merlin Bird ID app for free.
"Fielding Questions" columnist Don Kinzler also hears from readers on a smart tip to scare birds away from a tree and weighs in on pruning shrubs now after a hot summer.

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Julie Dickie is a state-licensed wildlife rehabilitator in northern Minnesota. Every year, at this time, we get many calls for birds that have struck windows. The birds are tired, and like people when we get tired, they don’t always make the best quick decisions.
BEMIDJI -- Minnesota is home to many types of woodpeckers, but the yellow-bellied sapsucker has the best name out of all of them -- at least in my opinion.
A bald eagle stretches its talons before landing on a television antenna with another eagle Friday, Feb 21, near Riverside Drive in Brainerd, Minn. The nearby open water of the Mississippi River offers prime hunting for the raptors. Steve Kohls / Brainerd Dispatch
A sweeping new study says a steep decline in bird abundance, including among common species, amounts to "an overlooked biodiversity crisis."
Lake property owners reporting more dead loons than usual this summer.
For years, as California's Central Valley grew into the nation's leading agricultural corridor, the region gradually lost almost all of the wetlands that birds, from the tiny sandpiper to the great blue heron, depend on during their migrations along the West Coast.

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Q: My peonies have powdery mildew and I'm wondering what I can do to get rid of it. What causes this? I'm planning to divide them this fall but I don't want to spread it into a different flower bed. -- Pat Johnson, Valley City, N.D.
ST. PAUL--For someone who's had a hand in the release of more than 10,000 rehabilitated birds of prey, Pat Redig seems to have a tough time being set free himself.
ALABASTER, Ala. - Charlie Stephenson gazed out her window one day in late January and spotted a peculiar bird in her backyard feeder. Stephenson, an avid bird watcher, realized it was a cardinal sporting bright yellow feathers instead of the usua...

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