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ROZUM: Regulations for insurance industry progress from House to Senate

[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_original","fid":"499492","attributes":{"alt":"Rep. Tona Rozum, R-Mitchell","class":"media-image","height":"290","title":"Rep. Tona Rozum, R-Mitchell","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"239"}}]]PIERRE -- The House ...


PIERRE - The House passed three bills that regulate the insurance industry; they will now go to the Senate. • HB1050 allows the Division of Insurance to fine an insurance company or producer (passed 69-0). Per current law, the license holder has to agree to the fine. • HB1052 allows the Division of Insurance the authority to disclose information concerning remedial actions agreed to by the licensee being investigated, remedial actions ordered as a result of an examination or investigation and any information the parties agree to release in writing. This passed unanimously. • HB1054 passed 63-7 and is a set of comprehensive regulations that allows the Division of Insurance the authority to handle unfair claims settlement practices. A long-term care insurance company doing business in South Dakota and refusing to pay claims for policy holders was the driver behind this legislation. Here are a few statistics and some information concerning Medicaid that will be good background: • Medicaid and CHIP (Children’s Health Insurance) currently covers 144,373 people, of which 69 percent are children. • 48 percent of all South Dakota children will rely on Medicaid or CHIP in their first year. • 56 percent of those in nursing homes are Medicaid dependent; 25 percent in assisted living facilities need Medicaid. • 35 percent of Medicaid individuals are American Indians; 10 percent of South Dakota’s population is American Indian. • A 2.94 percent increase in South Dakota’s portion of Medicaid (FMAP) will cost South Dakota’s taxpayers another $20 million. Those between 100 percent and 138 percent of the federal poverty level for income are eligible for subsidized health insurance now. Here is a real-person example for someone in the mid-income range for this category: • The annual cost of health insurance is fully subsidized by the federal government. • An unsubsidized deductible of $550 annually or $45 per month if insurance is utilized; prescriptions covered. • A person’s income increases to the top of the 138 percent range cost is $200 more per year. • The provider realizes a higher reimbursement from the insurance company than they would from Medicaid. The hole in the Affordable Care Act falls on those that are under 100 percent of the federal poverty level and the most in need of help. • 26,000 in South Dakota are in this category. • 50 percent are American Indians covered by Indian Health Services. • Approximately 7.6 percent of our population is totally without coverage. This uncovered group is the main concern. There are plenty of innovative ideas brewing. My desk on the floor of the House of Representatives is literally surrounded by health care providers: dentist, family practitioner, nurse practitioner, chiropractor. Needless to say we spend a fair amount of time discussing the issues with Medicaid. I most appreciate those who are in the trenches of providing health care sharing their experiences and ideas. Please touch base with any concerns, ideas, thoughts and solutions. Thanks, and we look forward to a cracker barrel on Feb. 8 in White Lake and on Feb. 22 in Mitchell. - Tona Rozum represents District 20 - Davison, Aurora and Jerauld counties - in the state House of Representatives.
PIERRE - The House passed three bills that regulate the insurance industry; they will now go to the Senate.• HB1050 allows the Division of Insurance to fine an insurance company or producer (passed 69-0). Per current law, the license holder has to agree to the fine.• HB1052 allows the Division of Insurance the authority to disclose information concerning remedial actions agreed to by the licensee being investigated, remedial actions ordered as a result of an examination or investigation and any information the parties agree to release in writing. This passed unanimously.• HB1054 passed 63-7 and is a set of comprehensive regulations that allows the Division of Insurance the authority to handle unfair claims settlement practices.A long-term care insurance company doing business in South Dakota and refusing to pay claims for policy holders was the driver behind this legislation.Here are a few statistics and some information concerning Medicaid that will be good background:• Medicaid and CHIP (Children’s Health Insurance) currently covers 144,373 people, of which 69 percent are children.• 48 percent of all South Dakota children will rely on Medicaid or CHIP in their first year.• 56 percent of those in nursing homes are Medicaid dependent; 25 percent in assisted living facilities need Medicaid.• 35 percent of Medicaid individuals are American Indians; 10 percent of South Dakota’s population is American Indian.• A 2.94 percent increase in South Dakota’s portion of Medicaid (FMAP) will cost South Dakota’s taxpayers another $20 million.Those between 100 percent and 138 percent of the federal poverty level for income are eligible for subsidized health insurance now. Here is a real-person example for someone in the mid-income range for this category:• The annual cost of health insurance is fully subsidized by the federal government.• An unsubsidized deductible of $550 annually or $45 per month if insurance is utilized; prescriptions covered.• A person’s income increases to the top of the 138 percent range cost is $200 more per year.• The provider realizes a higher reimbursement from the insurance company than they would from Medicaid.The hole in the Affordable Care Act falls on those that are under 100 percent of the federal poverty level and the most in need of help.• 26,000 in South Dakota are in this category.• 50 percent are American Indians covered by Indian Health Services.• Approximately 7.6 percent of our population is totally without coverage.This uncovered group is the main concern. There are plenty of innovative ideas brewing.My desk on the floor of the House of Representatives is literally surrounded by health care providers: dentist, family practitioner, nurse practitioner, chiropractor. Needless to say we spend a fair amount of time discussing the issues with Medicaid. I most appreciate those who are in the trenches of providing health care sharing their experiences and ideas.Please touch base with any concerns, ideas, thoughts and solutions.Thanks, and we look forward to a cracker barrel on Feb. 8 in White Lake and on Feb. 22 in Mitchell.- Tona Rozum represents District 20 - Davison, Aurora and Jerauld counties - in the state House of Representatives.

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