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PALACE CITY PROFILE: Raising corn, cattle and kids

His roots were firmly planted in farmland south of Mitchell, no matter where he went or how far, he always found himself coming back for planting season, harvest, to work on his family's farm.

Aimee and Chris Nebelsick farm south of Mitchell, raising everything from corn to cattle to their four children. Left to right are: Braedon, 10, Henley, 3, Aimee, Grason, 6, Chris and Madelyn, 7. (Photo courtesy of Mari Olson)
Aimee and Chris Nebelsick farm south of Mitchell, raising everything from corn to cattle to their four children. Left to right are: Braedon, 10, Henley, 3, Aimee, Grason, 6, Chris and Madelyn, 7. (Photo courtesy of Mari Olson)

His roots were firmly planted in farmland south of Mitchell, no matter where he went or how far, he always found himself coming back for planting season, harvest, to work on his family's farm.

She was born in California, grew up in Iowa, and was in school for dental assisting, but it's here where she met this farmer boy, hanging out with her sister's friends at college. She kept coming back, too, and on the day of her sister's wedding, Aimee and Chris officially started dating.

A year later they would be married, living on the family farm and raising four children on the edge of their land with a large rock welcoming visitors to the Nebelsicks' home.

Chris was born and raised in Mitchell and is a fifth-generation farmer. He works with his father Bill and grandfather Ed Strand, both of whom shaped the man and worker he is today. They raise corn, soybeans, wheat, alfalfa and cattle south of Mitchell.

"Growing up, I spent every minute out at the farm," Chris said. "I starting running equipment as a kid and when I was 16, I bought my first piece of land."

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That land wasn't good for farming, but under it was gravel - Chris' family helped him contract it out, and he used the money from that venture to buy more ground and expand his farm.

In 2001 he left for college at Oklahoma Wesleyan University, thinking he would become a storm chaser someday, but he flew or drove back to Mitchell at least 12 times to work on the farm - unable to let go of that piece of him.

In 2002, drought on the farm and an accident forced him to take a year off of school and also rethink his future plans.That year he started a snow removal business in town, and in 2003 he decided to enroll at Dakota Wesleyan University to be close to home and to keep his snow business going. While attending DWU he expanded his snow business by buying out his uncle, who also did snow removal.

He didn't get to become a storm chaser, but working in agriculture and snow removal, his livelihood is still pretty dependent on the weather.

"I couldn't have done it without my family helping me through," he said. "My grandpa is an amazing business man and my dad is the hardest worker I know."

Aimee grew up in Onawa, Iowa. She loves spending time with her family and friends. One sister was a student at DWU, and when Aimee came to visit, she met Chris. Once they made it official, their futures became pretty clear: this was home.

She works part-time at Mitchell Christian School for the Early Learning Center, runs errands for the farm and handles everything on the home-front with four children in school, activities and extracurriculars. They are both involved in Sunday school, Bible studies, marriage mentoring and community events at the Wesleyan Church.

"We have a wonderful church community," she said. "And Mitchell is larger than where I came from, but still has that small-town feel; you know a lot of people here and it's friendly."

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They both agree that Mitchell has what they need as a family and are very thankful for everything God has blessed their family with. Chris also appreciates how business-friendly it is and that there are so many amenities right here.

"We have three schools with the option of two private schools, we have two colleges, an awesome police force that's friendly and keeps us safe, two golf courses, an ethanol plant, equipment dealers, an elevator, right here," Chris said.

They both also take advantage of community events - softball and bowling leagues, two golf courses and a bean bag league. They used to play volleyball before their family started growing, and they love going to concerts and comedy shows at the Corn Palace, and take the family to Dakotafest each year.

"The kids really love it so we let them take one day out of school and we all go," Aimee said.

"We just know how blessed we are that we have all this right here," Chris said.

The one thing they don't do is plan anything for Friday nights.

"Friday night is family night, the kids really look forward to it, so that's our time at home - all six of us," Aimee added.

Related Topics: PALACE CITY PROFILE
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