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Letter: How Marxism has become local

These private-public partnerships have inserted a subversive element into our local governments. The media’s role should expose this, not promote or defend it.

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Recently Luke Hagen responded to criticism that this paper is not local anymore. Yes, this paper does cover local events, but it is done based on a narrative coming from the global technocrats, which locally equates to the Chamber of Commerce in partnership with city government.

When people say (and yes, I do hear your comments), “The local newspaper just isn’t local anymore,” my response: That’s just not true.

Bias is about what isn’t provided to the readers. For example,this paper’s coverage of the November 21 hearing on South Dakota’s Social studies standards held in Sioux Falls did not include my testimony. Much of my testimony was previously provided to the Mitchell School Board during public input and not covered by this paper.

This paper’s coverage said, “The final major point of the opponents was that educators were not adequately consulted in writing of these standards and, instead, have been directly or indirectly demeaned as agents of indoctrination by proponents of the standards.”

My testimony rebutted that point with : “Mitchell’s Dakota Wesleyan University requires History Education Majors to take their Multicultural class, whose textbook states, “Since the middle part of the 20th century social scientists have known that children as young as 3 years of age are able to differentiate human physical characteristics such as skin color. Children also, from the age 4, make attributions about others based on their skin color, associating black as negative value and white as positive value.”

I then said, “I obtain an actual of that 1948 Marxist based study and it was conducted on ages 11 to 16, not 3 to 5. Could it be that educators are being fooled into thinking all kids starting school in Kindergarten are racists?”

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This paper recently applauded DWU’s partnership with local schools.

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Seven 2022 DWU graduates find first full-time job teaching at Mitchell schools this year

Critical Race Theory has entered our public school via the universities and the National Council of the Social Studied (NCSS). I testified that the NCSS standards are clearly stated in Mitchell’s Eighth Grade Social Studies teacher guide, and I found “content that supported the CRT agenda.”

These private-public partnerships have inserted a subversive element into our local governments. The media’s role should expose this, not promote or defend it.

Steve Sibson

Mitchell

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