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LETTER: Get with the program, legislators

To the Editor: When Mike Vehle was inducted into the South Dakota Transportation Hall of Honor, Josh Klumb and Tona Rozum commended him on Senate Bill 1 that stuck it to everyone running cars, trucks, etc., to get money to fix the roads so farmer...

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To the Editor:

When Mike Vehle was inducted into the South Dakota Transportation Hall of Honor, Josh Klumb and Tona Rozum commended him on Senate Bill 1 that stuck it to everyone running cars, trucks, etc., to get money to fix the roads so farmers can get their crops to town.

Now let him introduce a bill, let's call it Senate Bill 2, to have the farmers hauling their grain to town with their tractors and trailers busting up the roads and paying no fuel or wheel tax, license plates or insurance, start paying taxes.

I used to haul all of my grain with my truck when I farmed east of Ethan until the state came out with a law that you could get plates for three, six, nine or 12 months for farm trucks. I chose less than 12. When the tags had expired, I went to my agent to take off my insurance. My agent lied to me and said as long as you own that truck, you have to keep insurance on it. Dumb me, I believed him and sold my truck.

I then started hauling it with my tractor and wagon. Kind of nice, eight wheels on the ground and no wheel or fuel tax, no plates or insurance. By Tripp, all kinds of tractors are hauling grain with two grain carts, 12 wheels, no tax and tying up traffic. This fall, east of Tripp on the road going past the county shed, a tractor was pulling four wagons.

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I wrote Gov. Dennis Daugaard last year and told him about all the tractors hauling grain and paying no taxes, etc. I got a letter back that said my original proposal did not include a dyed diesel tax or a revised wheel tax. However, I likely would not be opposed to either if they are included in the legislative final bill.

So get with it, Vehle.

Ray Grambihler

Tripp

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