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LETTER: Eyes that do not see

To the Editor: "The level of crime within any given geographical entity will always rise to the highest level tolerated by the culture within that entity." -- Harry Everhart All living carbon based organisms whether plant or animal will have limi...

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To the Editor:

"The level of crime within any given geographical entity will always rise to the highest level tolerated by the culture within that entity." - Harry Everhart

All living carbon based organisms whether plant or animal will have limitations on some of its senses.

Many societies in Western Civilizations have in their educational system self-imposed constraints on the history taught in public school systems. In the United States, the History taught briefly starts with a cursory glance at Origin of Mankind. Then the discussion moves to a time period just predating the rule of Egyptian Pharaohs. The Pharaohs were poly-deistic but eventually believed in one governing god. The sun god Ra was worshiped with guidance coming from Toth - The Egyptian Mystery School.

In the Eastern culture were the Zoroastrian and Hindus religions. Every culture teaches benevolence to its people and in general tolerates all races and cultures.

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Usually though with the blessing of its religious leaders, a leader will turn to war out of greed and for expanding his domain.

Racism and bigotry will eventually occur to the detriment of its society. Let our eyes be opened fully to Truth!

Harry L Everhart

Artesian

Related Topics: CRIME
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