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A different Trump rose in Cleveland

PIERRE -- The 2016 presidential campaign is one for the ages and the aged. Republican nominee Donald Trump turned 70 on June 14. Democratic nominee-to-be Hillary Clinton would be 69 on Oct. 26. Trump would be the oldest president if he wins. Clin...

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PIERRE - The 2016 presidential campaign is one for the ages and the aged.

Republican nominee Donald Trump turned 70 on June 14. Democratic nominee-to-be Hillary Clinton would be 69 on Oct. 26.

Trump would be the oldest president if he wins. Clinton wouldn't be far off.

The record-holder is Ronald Reagan.

He was 69 years, 349 days old when he was inaugurated Jan. 20, 1981, and just shy of age 78 when he left the White House.

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One man's life doesn't make a rule, but his second term raised questions about what age might be too old.

President Barack Obama will be 55 on Aug. 4. No one is questioning his mental acuity as he finishes.

For a while this past winter and spring, many people looked at the Republican and Democratic fields of candidates and wondered: Would a third Obama term (if legal) be such a bad thing?

We're now at a point where the two major party candidates are older than standard retirement age and could be collecting pension checks.

Because of their proximity in ages, it's difficult for either side to argue that Trump or Clinton is too old.

It's also difficult to say America is getting its best. For many Trump triggers disgust. For many Clinton triggers distrust. For him it's deliberately insulting tweets. For her it's blatantly unsecured emails.

And the guy who was polling so well among younger voters in the Democratic primaries and caucuses, Vermont U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders, is older than both of them. He turns 75 on Sept. 4.

One of Trump's children, Ivanka, made her appeal to her generation on Thursday night, saying she hasn't automatically voted Republican or Democratic but favored the best candidate.

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She also put forth what might be the winning answer for her father.

Ivanka Trump, who turns 35 on Oct. 30, talked about the disparity in wages for women and men. The largest gap, she said, was between working mothers and men.

This should be Hillary Clinton's issue as the woman in the contest.

Yet Donald Trump, presuming he would follow through if elected, is appealing to the demographic blocs where he is weakest.

The paradox is that Trump also is essentially telling business owners they need to spend more, on average at least 20 percent more for working mothers on their payrolls.

That's roughly what South Dakota teachers on average are getting - a 20 percent bump - with the tax increase approved by the Legislature last winter.

People change jobs and change cities for 20 percent raises.

Trump also is trying to connect with women on community safety, especially mothers who have lost children to street violence.

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That too was Clinton's issue.

Trump shared the same convention stage as Peter Thiel who proclaimed he is openly gay.

That is another paradox. The Republican National Committee approved a resolution in January that started transgender-bathroom fights in many states.

Here, Gov. Dennis Daugaard vetoed state restrictions but agreed to a lawsuit fighting President Obama's non-discrimination national policy.

The week in Cleveland attempted to show a more inclusive Donald Trump. The 100 days ahead will tell us whether that is the case.

Now comes Hillary's week in Philadelphia.

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