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Tick season is in full swing. Find out what to do if a tick bites you

Ticks are out and waiting to hitch a ride and grab a bite. Out of you. In this episode of NewsMD's "Health Fusion," Viv Williams has tips on what you should do if a tick bites you.

Ticks
Ticks can transmit diseases, including Lyme disease and Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever
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ROCHESTER, Minn. — It is tick season again. I know that firsthand, as one of the little critters crawled across my face when I was gardening.

Some ticks carry bacteria that transmit diseases, such as Lyme disease or Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever. If you find a tick attached to your skin, the Mayo Clinic News Network has an article with suggestions as to who to do:

  • Remove the tick carefully and as soon as possible. Use fine tipped tweezers to pull the entire tick out without twisting it. Don't use petroleum jelly, fingernail polish or a hot match.
  • Save it in a sealed container if possible in case a health care provider wants to see it.
  • Wash your hands and the bite with warm soapy water or rubbing alcohol.

Call your health care provider if:

  • You can't remove all of the tick.
  • You develop a rash that gets bigger.
  • You get a fever or flu-like symptoms.
  • You think you may have been bitten by a deer tick.

Call 911 if you develop:

  • A severe headache
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Paralysis
  • Heart palpitations

Antibiotics can be very effective against Lyme disease, so don't delay seeing your healthcare provider.

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Follow the  Health Fusion podcast on  Apple,   Spotify and  Google podcasts. For comments or other podcast episode ideas, email Viv Williams at  vwilliams@newsmd.com. Or on Twitter/Instagram/FB @vivwilliamstv.

MORE HEALTH FUSION:
Do you overindulge on Thanksgiving? A lot of people do. It can be hard to resist recipes you only get during the holidays. But if you chow down on foods and drinks that are high in salt, fat or caffeine, you may be at risk of "holiday heart." Viv Williams has details from Mayo Clinic cardiologists in this episode of NewsMD's "Health Fusion."

Opinion by Viv Williams
Viv Williams hosts the NewsMD podcast and column, "Health Fusion." She is an Emmy (and other) award-winning health and medical reporter whose stories have run on TV, digital and newspaper outlets nationwide. Viv is passionate about boosting people's health and happiness by helping them access credible, reliable and research-based health information from top experts. She regularly interviews experts and patients from leading medical institutions, such as Mayo Clinic.
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