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Stressed out because there's too much to do? Get tips on how to calm the craziness through meditation

In today's world, stress is everywhere. Sometimes your to-do list becomes overwhelming. Meditation — even just 30 seconds a day— can help. In this episode of NewsMD's "Health Fusion," Viv Williams talks with a meditation expert who explains how it works, gives a shout out to a study that about how meditation helps US Marines recover from stress and gives tips on how to fit meditation into your day. Give the practice a try on World Meditation Day, which happens yearly on Saturday, May 21.

Meditation
World Meditation Day takes place every year on May 21st. (Andrea De Martin/Dreamstime/TNS)
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ROCHESTER, Minn. — If you had medication that could lower stress, help control anxiety and promote good moods, would you take it? That drug may exist in the form of meditation. Even 30 seconds a day can make a positive difference in your life. Especially when the going gets crazy busy and your to-do list seems overwhelming.

Bruce Alfred is a meditation expert and owner of BolsterUp , a coaching and consulting company for individuals and organizations based in Rochester, Minnesota. He says it's possible to fit meditation into the busiest of days.

"Meditation can help you manage the pace and obligations of today's world," Alfred said. "In times when we're in a work day and we have two minutes before we have to go in a meeting, we can practice the pause. When you just had a difficult conversation or feel like you've just been thrown a curve ball, practice the pause. It can help you feel grounded and able to respond to the situation at hand with control and resilience."

Watch or listen to this episode of NewsMD's "Health Fusion," as Alfred explains how meditation works, notes the results of a study about how meditation helps US Marines recover from stress and demonstrates how to do the 30-second pause.

Check out Bolsterup.life to learn more or to contact Alfred.

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Follow the  Health Fusion podcast on  Apple,   Spotify and  Google podcasts. For comments or other podcast episode ideas, email Viv Williams at  vwilliams@newsmd.com. Or on Twitter/Instagram/FB @vivwilliamstv.

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If you don't have a side veggie for tonight's dinner, no problem. Toss in a big bunch of fresh herbs. They're full of flavor and can boost your health. In this episode of NewsMD's "Health Fusion," Viv Williams checks out the benefits of herbs and gives a tip on how to store them so they last longer.

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