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Yankton partners with humane society for better impound

YANKTON (AP) -- Yankton's city pound will be phased out in favor of an agreement with a better facility to house the city's impounded animals. The city commission voted to enter into an agreement with the Heartland Humane Society, the Yankton Pre...

YANKTON (AP) - Yankton's city pound will be phased out in favor of an agreement with a better facility to house the city's impounded animals.

The city commission voted to enter into an agreement with the Heartland Humane Society, the Yankton Press and Dakotan reported.

"We've been working with Heartland Humane Society to partner with them to streamline our services with our animal population," Nelson said.

City Manager Amy Nelson said the agreement has been a long time in the making. She added that the human society facility is growing and far surpasses Yankton's current pound.

"I would call that facility adequate, and I would call what Heartland Humane can provide for animals in our community to be far more adequate, as well as provide a better setting for animals that are running at large or injured," Nelson said.

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Nelson said impoundment at the facility would begin once the human society expands its facility.

The humane society facility would be subject to city ordinance and regulation. It would also provide 24-hour access to the Yankton Police Department.

"We currently have $10,000 budgeted for our pound," she said. "Over the years, with the condition of our pound, we've needed to spend a lot of that capital to keep it going and keep it an adequate facility."

Yankton's current pound will be kept open for a few months to measure how the agreement is working and to allow the humane society to finish its expansion.

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