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Woman accused of hitting man with minivan in Mitchell

An Indiana woman has been charged with felony hit-and-run after allegedly hitting her children's father with her minivan on July 29 in Mitchell. Suleyma Tapia, 28, of West Lafayette, Indiana, was found while trying to get on to the Interstate 90 ...

police lights.jpg
Police lights. (Republic file photo)

An Indiana woman has been charged with felony hit-and-run after allegedly hitting her children's father with her minivan on July 29 in Mitchell.

Suleyma Tapia, 28, of West Lafayette, Indiana, was found while trying to get on to the Interstate 90 eastbound ramp off Burr Street.

According to court documents, the incident may have begun with a disagreement over child custody. While sitting in her minivan, Tapia reportedly called for her children, their father and another man to come outside. While the victim was still walking toward her, Tapia allegedly accelerated away from the curb, hitting him with the front left corner of the van. One witness reported having heard yelling followed by the sound of a vehicle speeding away.

The victim sustained bruising and redness on his rib cage, but declined to be transported to the hospital.

Tapia is charged with hit-and-run causing death or injury, a Class 6 felony punishable by up to two years in prison and a fine of $4,000. She was released from jail after her $2,000 bond was paid following her arrest. Tapia is scheduled to appear in court on Aug. 30.

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