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Federal help coming for SD following Presidential Disaster Declaration

President Donald Trump late on Friday approved South Dakota's request for a Presidential Disaster Declaration following the winter weather and spring flooding.

This allows federal money to be used to help South Dakotans and local governments recover from property damage due to the weather.

"This is great news for our state as it means that those still recovering from the severe weather will get much-needed assistance," Gov. Kristi Noem said. "We thank the president for his actions."

FEMA teams will soon be coming to South Dakota to document damage on both public and private property. A press release from Noem's office said more details on that process will be announced at a later date.

South Dakota's congressional delegation also applauded the president's decision to sign the disaster declaration.

"South Dakotans need relief," said Rep. Dusty Johnson. "This declaration will allow our state to access recently passed disaster assistance to move forward from the unprecedented and ongoing flooding, and I'm grateful the Trump administration recognized this expediently. When times got tough, South Dakota's leadership, first responders, and local and state officials stepped up to the plate and for that I'm extremely grateful."

On May 22, Noem requested FEMA assistance to help with the damage. The preliminary assessment indicates about $43 million to public infrastructure in 58 counties and three indian reservations, according to Noem's office.

Sen. John Thune thanked Noem for her work to help get the disaster declaration approved.

"I'm grateful for the administration's action to help ensure that hard-hit South Dakota communities will be able to get back to normal as fast as possible following these devastating storms," said Thune.

Added Sen. Mike Rounds: "I thank President Trump for recognizing the need to provide disaster assistance to South Dakota communities impacted by recent storms. This will help communities and families across the state rebuild critical infrastructure, homes and businesses that were severely damaged."

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