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Trump's campaign should be fair game in Trump University trial: lawyers

(Reuters) - Statements Donald Trump has made during his presidential run should generally be admissible in an upcoming civil trial over alleged fraud at his Trump University venture, lawyers for the plaintiffs said in a court filing late on Tuesday.

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Donald Trump goes to a Wawa gas station after a campaign event in King of Prussia, Pennsylvania. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri

(Reuters) - Statements Donald Trump has made during his presidential run should generally be admissible in an upcoming civil trial over alleged fraud at his Trump University venture, lawyers for the plaintiffs said in a court filing late on Tuesday.

Some of the statements by the Republican nominee may be helpful to jurors as they try to determine Trump's credibility, the lawyers wrote, calling his credibility a central issue.

Students at Trump University have sued in a federal court in San Diego, claiming they were defrauded by its real estate seminars. A trial is set to begin on Nov. 28.

Last month, Trump's attorneys said evidence and statements from the election campaign should be barred from the trial because they could unfairly prejudice the jury. Their request would include allegations of sexual misconduct, which Trump has denied during the campaign.

Lawyers for the plaintiffs said Trump's request was far too broad, threatening to exclude a "mélange of misrepresentations, falsehoods and flip-flops" that would impeach Trump's credibility as a witness.

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"In the course of the campaign, news organizations have collected and publicized practically every known Trump falsehood over the years, bringing all such statements within the gambit of Trump's motion," lawyer Brian Cochran and others wrote.

A lawyer for Trump could not immediately be reached for comment on Wednesday.

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