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Tripp-Delmont voters OK continued opt-out

Voters in the Tripp-Delmont School District approved the continuance of the district's $300,000 optout Tuesday. The unofficial tally was 458 for the opt-out, and 91 against it. Voter turnout was 49 percent. An opt-out is an action taken by a scho...

Voters in the Tripp-Delmont School District approved the continuance of the district's $300,000 optout Tuesday.

The unofficial tally was 458 for the opt-out, and 91 against it. Voter turnout was 49 percent.

An opt-out is an action taken by a school board to raise more revenue than the state's property-tax freeze would otherwise allow. Tripp-Delmont's superintendent, Lynn Vlasman, has said the district already made numerous cuts for the next school year and would face additional cuts without the opt-out money.

The election was prompted by petitioners who opposed continuing the optout.

Loren and Marlene Buchholz, owners of the Prairie Pumper, a gas station on Main Street in Tripp, had not voted as of 10 a.m. but said they were planning on voting for the opt-out.

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"The main thing is for the children, if we don't vote yes we will lose some teachers and that will hurt the school," Loren said.

"Eventually, it would downsize the schools, and if you lose your school you lose your town," Marlene said.

At the American Legion, where the voting was taking place, Tripp residents could be seen outside discussing the vote.

Polling place workers said the turnout for the election had been good, noting 120 people voted in the first two hours.

Yvonne and Tom Brown, retirees who moved to Tripp five years ago, both voted in favor of the opt-out Tuesday morning.

"We have an excellent school system here and our taxes our very low," Tom said.

"We just want to keep it (the school) how it is," Yvonne added.

Lynn D'amico also voted for the opt-out and said, "I don't want to lose our school. We just need to keep it how it is."

Related Topics: DELMONTEDUCATION
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