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Tripp County man convicted of assault

WINNER--An Ideal, South Dakota man was convicted recently of two assaults and was sentenced to one year of probation. Jarod Jedlicki, 51, was arrested Sept. 5 in connection with two incidents that took place that same day in Tripp County and that...

The Tripp County courthouse. (Republic file photo)
The Tripp County courthouse. (Republic file photo)

WINNER-An Ideal, South Dakota man was convicted recently of two assaults and was sentenced to one year of probation.

Jarod Jedlicki, 51, was arrested Sept. 5 in connection with two incidents that took place that same day in Tripp County and that involved two victims.

Jedlicki was first charged with third-degree rape, a Class 2 felony, on Sept. 5. An amended complaint charging him additionally with two counts of sexual contact with someone not capable of consent was filed on Oct. 15.

Jedlicki's rape charge and one of the sexual contact charges were reduced on Oct. 16. His final charges included one count of sexual contact with someone not capable of consent, two counts of simple assault in an attempt to put another in fear of bodily harm and one count of interference with emergency communications.

He pleaded guilty to both simple assault charges on Dec. 19, and the other two charges were dismissed.

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On that same day, Jedlicki was sentenced to 360 days in jail with 356 days suspended, credit for four days served and one year of unsupervised probation under the conditions that he must comply with the 24/7 sobriety program and that he cannot have any contact with the two victims involved in the case for one year. He was ordered to pay a total of $1,223 in fines and court costs.

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