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Tribe: Cultural sites found in path of proposed oil pipeline

BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) -- The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe says it has found several sites of "significant cultural and historic value" along the path of a proposed oil pipeline.

BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) - The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe says it has found several sites of "significant cultural and historic value" along the path of a proposed oil pipeline.

The tribe is challenging the Army Corps of Engineers' decision to grant permits for Dallas-based Energy Transfer Partners' $3.8 billion Dakota Access pipeline, which crosses the Dakotas and Iowa to Illinois, including near the reservation in southern North Dakota. A federal judge will rule before Sept. 9 whether construction can be halted on the Dakota Access pipeline.

Tribal preservation officer Tim Mentz says in court documents filed Friday that the tribe was only recently allowed to survey private land north of the Standing Rock Sioux reservation.

Mentz says researches found cairns, burials and other sites of historic significance to Native Americans.

Related Topics: DAKOTA ACCESS PIPELINE
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