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TransCanada applies for permit to build Keystone XL pipeline

The Keystone XL pipeline could be coming to South Dakota. On Thursday, TransCanada Corporation announced it has applied for a permit to build its international oil pipeline through the U.S. and Canada just two days after President Donald Trump si...

Pipes for TransCanada Corp's planned Keystone XL oil pipeline are pictured in Gascoyne, North Dakota in this November 14, 2014 file photo. REUTERS/Andrew Cullen/Files
Pipes for Transcanada Corp's planned Keystone XL oil pipeline are pictured in Gascoyne, North Dakota in this November 14, 2014 file photo. REUTERS/Andrew Cullen/Files

The Keystone XL pipeline could be coming to South Dakota.

On Thursday, TransCanada Corporation announced it has applied for a permit to build its international oil pipeline through the U.S. and Canada just two days after President Donald Trump signed an executive order fast-tracking the project.

The 1,179-mile pipeline that would run through Jones, Lyman and Tripp counties scored support from U.S. Sens. John Thune and Mike Rounds on Tuesday, as well as U.S. Rep. Kristi Noem. Each legislator highlighted their perceived benefits of the oil pipeline projects, including a temporary increase in construction jobs and the ability it would give the nation to improve its energy independence.

In a press release issued Thursday, a TransCanada official said the project would provide “tens of thousands of well-paying jobs and generate substantial economic benefit” in both the U.S. and Canada.

“KXL will strengthen the United States' energy security and remains in the national interest,” said Russ Girling, president and chief executive officer of TransCanada in a written statement. “The project is an important new piece of modern U.S. infrastructure that secures access to an abundant energy resource produced by a neighbor that shares a commitment to a clean and healthy environment.”

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On Tuesday, shortly after Trump signed a pair of executive actions expediting the approval process for the Keystone XL, environmentalists stood in opposition to the project.

But Girling attempted to downplay the environmental impact of the pipeline.

“Numerous studies have shown that pipelines are a safer and more environmentally sound way to transport oil to market than trains and KXL raises the bar on both fronts,” Girling said.

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