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Thune spreads 'the good news' on tax reform

One-by-one, a key player in the tax reform debate listed some of the many companies that improved their employees' financial well-being since the tax overhaul was approved.

U.S. Sen. John Thune, R-South Dakota, speaks to the Rotary Club of Mitchell in September 2017 at the Ramada Inn. (Caitlynn Peetz / Republic)
U.S. Sen. John Thune, R-South Dakota, speaks to the Rotary Club of Mitchell in September 2017 at the Ramada Inn. (Caitlynn Peetz / Republic)
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One-by-one, a key player in the tax reform debate listed some of the many companies that improved their employees' financial well-being since the tax overhaul was approved.

U.S. Sen. John Thune, a South Dakota Republican and member of the Senate Finance Committee, took Wednesday to celebrate the initial impact of the reforms that cut taxes for corporations and the majority of individuals.

From Pfizer to Fiat Chrysler to Great Western Bank and AT&T, Thune hit the Senate floor this week to spread "the good news."

"Good jobs, good wages and good opportunities were in short supply during the last presidency, and we are determined to improve things for American workers," Thune said in a prepared speech.

Thune, who was re-elected in a landslide victory in 2016, said more than 300 companies have announced plans to "invest in their workers, raise wages, create new jobs and invest in the U.S. economy."

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Unlike their corporate counterparts that announce major wage increases, Thune said small and medium businesses, farms and ranches will also see an improved economic outlook.

"We expanded business owners' ability to recover investments they make in their businesses, which will free up cash that they can reinvest in their operations and their workers," Thune said.

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