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Three men arrested for possessing 2 pounds of meth in Chamberlain

CHAMBERLAIN -- Three people are accused of distributing and manufacturing drugs after allegedly being found with more than 2 pounds of meth in Chamberlain.

Methamphetamine problem (Republic photo illustration)
Methamphetamine (Republic photo illustration)

CHAMBERLAIN - Three people are accused of distributing and manufacturing drugs after allegedly being found with more than 2 pounds of meth in Chamberlain.

On Jan. 12, Chamberlain police officers received information from Minnesota police of a vehicle containing a large amount of methamphetamine possibly traveling through the area. Police located the vehicle at a gas station in Chamberlain. The suspected driver, Cody Johnson, had a revoked license, so Chamberlain police pulled it over after it left the gas station, according to court documents.

Upon conducting the traffic stop, the officer learned the driver was Richard Fleisch, of Latham, New York. The officer questioned Fleisch, who said there was nothing illegal in the car, but later admitted there was marijuana in the back seat. Fleisch, Johnson and a third passenger, Lucas Gage, were detained while officers conducted a more thorough search of the car. Gage and Johnson are both from Minnesota.

The officers found 2.11 pounds of meth, a half-pound of marijuana, several containers of THC wax, one-fourth ounce of psilocybin mushrooms, several scales and drug paraphernalia.

The three men were charged with two counts of manufacturing and distribution of illegal drugs, a Class 4 felony, possession of more than a half-pound of marijuana, a Class 5 felony, possession of a controlled substance, a Class 5 felony, and use or possession of drug paraphernalia, a misdemeanor.

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Class 5 felonies are punishable upon conviction by up to five years in prison and a $10,000 fine. Class 4 felonies are punishable by up to 10 years in prison and a $20,000 fine.

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