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Students at moldy school to return to classes next week

RAPID CITY (AP) -- Hundreds of Rapid City elementary students whose school was shut down last week after the discovery of mold are to return to classes on Tuesday.

RAPID CITY (AP) - Hundreds of Rapid City elementary students whose school was shut down last week after the discovery of mold are to return to classes on Tuesday.

Black Hawk Elementary was shut down for inspection at the end of classes Sept. 30 after mold was found in an interior wall.

Testing this week to determine the extent of the problem found mold in the front entrance, a music room, a multipurpose room and a bathroom. The mold problem was caused by a leak in the roof, a leaky fixture in the affected bathroom and moisture seeping in through windows, according to Building and Grounds Manager Kit Cline.

None of the 410 students has reported any mold-related health problems, according to Assistant Superintendent Dave Janak.

Contractors are working to remove the mold, and the school's windows are being resealed to prevent more moisture from getting into the building. The windows might eventually need to be replaced, Cline said.

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Beginning Oct. 17, school days will be extended by half an hour until the winter break to make up for the lost class time.

"I want to say thank you in advance for all of the students, staff, and families who are going to have to make some adjustments over the next few weeks," Assistant Superintendent Brad Berens said during a press conference Wednesday.

Related Topics: EDUCATIONHEALTH
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