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Springfield residents recovering from Labor Day wind storm

SPRINGFIELD (AP) -- Springfield residents say they're still recovering from wind storm earlier this month that left 70 residents without a home. Springfield city councilman Steve Green tells the Yankton Daily Press & Dakotan that those reside...

SPRINGFIELD (AP) - Springfield residents say they're still recovering from wind storm earlier this month that left 70 residents without a home.

Springfield city councilman Steve Green tells the Yankton Daily Press & Dakotan that those residents who needed shelter after the Sept. 5 storm now have a place to stay.

Officials said Springfield residents with damaged or destroyed homes can check in to various programs, including some at the state level.

Around a half-dozen homes were destroyed on Sept 5 when a storm with winds exceeding 110 mph raked the southeast part of the city. Winds also damaged dozens of homes and trees.

On Sunday, residents will host a meal to thank hundreds of volunteers who helped recovery efforts after the storm. Green says residents are grateful no one died or suffered major injuries during the storm.

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"I've said from the beginning that I'm pretty impressed with anybody who helped, whether they were from the community or from somewhere else," Green said.

But Green notes that the cleanup did result in "some streets being torn up" by heavy equipment. City Finance Officer Ashlea Pruss is checking on available funding to repair the streets.

In addition, the city will replace about a half-dozen tables blown away in Terrace Park.

Related Topics: WEATHER
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