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Spring Ring bells concert inset for Sunday

Dakota Wesleyan University's Wesleyan Bells will partner with three area bells groups to perform a "Spring Ring" concert. The First United Methodist Church Circuit Ringers of Mitchell, the Glorious Company Ringers of St. Martin's Lutheran Church ...

Dakota Wesleyan University's Wesleyan Bells will partner with three area bells groups to perform a "Spring Ring" concert.

The First United Methodist Church Circuit Ringers of Mitchell, the Glorious Company Ringers of St. Martin's Lutheran Church in Alexandria, and the First Lutheran Handbells of Mitchell will join the Wesleyan Bells to perform 14 pieces during this free concert at 4 p.m., Sunday at the First United Methodist Church, Mitchell.

"We will be ringing in the opening piece, a wonderful arrangement of 'How Great Thou Art,' and the closing piece, 'Rondeau,' as four combined bell choirs," said Erin Desmond, voice and piano instructor at DWU, and director of the Wesleyan Bells.

Arnold Braught will conduct the First Lutheran Handbells in "Amazing Grace" and "God, Who Stretched the Spangled Heavens." Braught will also conduct the First United Methodist Church Circuit Ringers in "They'll Know We Are Christians by Our Love" and "Just a Closer Walk." Elizabeth Soladay will conduct the Glorious Company of Ringers in "O Come, O Come Emmanuel" and "Hail the Day That Sees Him Rise."

The Wesleyan Bells will perform six secular and sacred pieces, including "Ring Praise, O My Soul," "Festive Praise," "Pirates of the Caribbean" and "Phantom of the Opera."

Related Topics: MUSIC
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