ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

South Dakota lawmakers send gun bills to unfriendly governor

PIERRE (AP) -- Senate lawmakers approved bills Monday that would allow guns in the state Capitol and let people carry concealed handguns without a permit despite Gov. Dennis Daugaard's threat to veto both proposals.

2273896+SD state capitol3.jpg
South Dakota State Capitol

PIERRE (AP) - Senate lawmakers approved bills Monday that would allow guns in the state Capitol and let people carry concealed handguns without a permit despite Gov. Dennis Daugaard's threat to veto both proposals.

Daugaard's opposition is a steep obstacle for lawmakers pushing the bills, neither of which received the two-thirds support required for a potential veto override.

The Senate voted 19-15 to send the Capitol carry bill to the governor's desk. It would allow people who have an enhanced permit to bring concealed handguns into the Capitol if they register beforehand with security.

In 2016, 1,460 new enhanced permits were issued. Republican Sen. Jim Stalzer, the bill's main Senate sponsor, said most active shooter situations occur in gun-free zones such as the state Capitol.

There are no metal detectors or other security checks at the Capitol entrances to enforce the current prohibition on most people carrying guns in the building.

ADVERTISEMENT

The chamber also voted 23-11 to allow people who can legally carry a concealed handgun in South Dakota to do so without a permit. Right now, it's a misdemeanor for someone to carry a concealed pistol or to have one concealed in a vehicle without a permit.

Daugaard has praised South Dakota's "reasonable" gun laws, saying that some states are much more restrictive.

At the end of February, there were 92,850 active regular and enhanced permits in South Dakota, according to the Secretary of State's office.

What To Read Next
Members Only
Although Mitchell's rates would be increase, the proposed equitable rate structure could lessen the increased costs for residential customers' water and sewer bills.
“We see that when things happen in the coastal areas, a few years later, they start trending toward the Midwest,” said Rep. Ben Krohmer, serving his first term in the House.
“This is sensationalism at its finest, and it does not deserve to be heard in our state capitol,” Rep. Erin Healy, a Democrat and one of 10 votes against the bill in the 70-person chamber, said.
Members Only
Prior to be sentenced to prison, a Mitchell man blamed the winter weather and slick roads for his DUI charge and said he wouldn't have been pulled over had it not been for the "crazy weather."