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Sex offender arrested on drug charges

A registered sex offender who had not given notice of his change of address was arrested Monday after a search warrant for a drug investigation was executed on his new home.

police lights.jpg
Police lights. (Republic file photo)

A registered sex offender who had not given notice of his change of address was arrested Monday after a search warrant for a drug investigation was executed on his new home.

In June, Police were notified that Andrew Engles, 23, of Mitchell, was no longer living at the address at which he was registered. When a warrant was executed on an East Second Avenue house at 1:21 p.m., Monday, evidence that Engles was living there was reportedly found.

According to court documents, this evidence included a computer, a dog and clothes belonging to Engels, as well as rent receipts with Engles' and his roommate's names on them.

In the room where Engles' belongings were found, police allegedly also located bags of marijuana, containers of THC wax, a digital scale, unused plastic bags and about $1,400 in cash. Engles reportedly admitted to using marijuana.

Engles is charged with failure to provide correct information for registration, failure to give notice of a new address and possession with intent to distribute less than one ounce of marijuana, all of which are Class 6 felonies punishable by up to two years in prison and a $4,000 fine. He is also charged with possession of a controlled substance, THC wax, a Class 5 felony that could get him an additional five years in prison and $10,000 in fines, and possession of drug paraphernalia, a Class 2 misdemeanor.

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