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SD Legislature to study school funding

PIERRE -- Seven years ago a panel of citizens and legislators selected by the governor spent many hours analyzing South Dakota's system for funding public schools. Now the Legislature wants to take another look.

PIERRE -- Seven years ago a panel of citizens and legislators selected by the governor spent many hours analyzing South Dakota's system for funding public schools. Now the Legislature wants to take another look.

South Dakota's school-funding formula and all sources of schools' revenue will be the subject of a study this summer and fall by a committee of 15 lawmakers yet to be chosen.

The topic received the highest total of votes in a survey of legislators about what they want studied during the interim before the 2014 session.

The Legislature's Executive Board agreed Tuesday, after some wrangling, to designate school funding as one of three possible topics for interim studies.

The board selected domestic violence laws as topic No. 2 because several attempts at changes in recent years have wound up deadlocked after passing in different versions in the Senate and the House of Representatives.

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As for a third topic, none could get a majority among the 14 Executive Board members participating Tuesday.

The board agreed that Medicaid expansion, which ranked third-highest in the legislator survey, was already being covered by a task force that Gov. Dennis Daugaard assembled.

The next step for the Executive Board is to select the nine legislators who will be on the domestic-violence committee and the 15 who will comprise the education funding committee.

Related Topics: EDUCATIONCRIME
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