ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

SD House OKs help for deaf children

PIERRE -- South Dakota children who are deaf or hard of hearing could receive more help from state government under legislation that won approval Tuesday from the state House of Representatives.

The S.D. House of Representatives meets during the 2018 legislative session. (Matt Gade / Republic)
The S.D. House of Representatives meets during the 2018 legislative session. (Matt Gade / Republic)

PIERRE - South Dakota children who are deaf or hard of hearing could receive more help from state government under legislation that won approval Tuesday from the state House of Representatives.

House members decided 62-3 to create an advisory council of nine to 15 people who would work with the state Department of Education on resources for language development parents could use.

Representatives also agreed 64-1 the state Board of Regents could hire one person to be superintendent for the state School for the Deaf at Sioux Falls and the state School for the Blind and Visually Impaired in Aberdeen.

Marj Kaiser has held both jobs for eight years.

HB 1155 and HB 1058 head to the governor's office for review.

ADVERTISEMENT

Wine deal

House members approved a one-year deal that creates a wine-manufacturing class of licenses.

SB 187 limits manufacturers to importing 50 percent of bulk wine from outside South Dakota.

State law otherwise restricts farm wineries to South Dakota products unless a state official grants exemptions to individual applicants.

The sides reached agreement last week.

"There are jobs that rely on this," Rep. Tim Rounds, R-Pierre, said. The House vote was 58-7.

The bill now returns to the Senate for a decision whether to agree.

Still working

ADVERTISEMENT

The scope of the Building South Dakota Fund would get smaller and be funded at $5 million annually under legislation House members accepted Tuesday.

"It's been very successful, especially on the South Dakota Housing opportunity fund," Rep. David Lust, R-Rapid City, said.

The Legislature created the economic development package of programs in 2013, tapping the state treasurer's unclaimed property fund.

The next year Gov. Dennis Daugaard offered a lump sum of $30 million for three years that lawmakers accepted instead.

Now, a combination of sources would provide $5 million per year in SB 81. The House supported it 47-19. That's the minimum of ayes for the two-thirds majority necessary.

House Democratic Leader Spencer Hawley, of Brookings, supported the deal but said the "executive branch," his term for Republican Gov. Dennis Daugaard, was dictating terms to the Legislature.

"It's a long way of saying I'm really frustrated," Hawley said.

He told newer House members: "You need to remember the intent of this."

ADVERTISEMENT

The legislation returns to the Senate for further action.

St. Peter

South Dakota seems headed toward Aug. 27 becoming a working holiday for Peter Norbeck.

The House voted 63-3 to honor the former governor and U.S. senator.

SB 204 now goes to the governor for review.

"Norbeck made South Dakota what it is today," Rep. Tom Holmes, R-Sioux Falls, said.

Among his achievements were creating Custer State Park, bringing President Calvin Coolidge to the State Game Lodge and arranging early funding for sculpting Mount Rushmore National Memorial.

"We all know how important Mount Rushmore is," Rep. Tim Reed, R-Brookings, said. "Norbeck worked tirelessly to improve South Dakota."

Related Topics: GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS
What To Read Next
Members Only
Although Mitchell's rates would be increase, the proposed equitable rate structure could lessen the increased costs for residential customers' water and sewer bills.
“We see that when things happen in the coastal areas, a few years later, they start trending toward the Midwest,” said Rep. Ben Krohmer, serving his first term in the House.
“This is sensationalism at its finest, and it does not deserve to be heard in our state capitol,” Rep. Erin Healy, a Democrat and one of 10 votes against the bill in the 70-person chamber, said.
Members Only
Prior to be sentenced to prison, a Mitchell man blamed the winter weather and slick roads for his DUI charge and said he wouldn't have been pulled over had it not been for the "crazy weather."