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Sanford Health pledges up to $3 million to Minnesota college

SIOUX FALLS (AP) -- Dakotas-based Sanford Health is pledging up to $3 million to help a Minnesota college pay for a $45 million science complex. Sanford CEO Kelby Krabbenhoft is a 1980 graduate of Concordia College and also serves on the private ...

SIOUX FALLS (AP) - Dakotas-based Sanford Health is pledging up to $3 million to help a Minnesota college pay for a $45 million science complex.

Sanford CEO Kelby Krabbenhoft is a 1980 graduate of Concordia College and also serves on the private liberal arts school's Board of Regents. Sanford Health will match 10 percent of donations to the school's capital campaign, up to $3 million.

"While we typically do not invest in general science infrastructure, we were moved by the market impact for enrollment growth and the focus on health careers at Concordia as a result of this project," Krabbenhoft said in a statement Wednesday.

The project will update and expand laboratories and classrooms in the Ivers and Jones Science Center on the Moorhead campus.

"Science study and health professions preparation are marks of distinction for Concordia College and its talented graduates, who regularly become leaders in medicine, nursing, research, and health care administration," President William Craft said in a statement. "This match will inspire new giving to the project, for which fundraising has already been strong."

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To date, $27 million has been raised. Construction is to begin in April and wrap up in August 2017.

Sanford, based in Sioux Falls, S.D., and Fargo, N.D., bills itself as one of the largest health systems in the nation, with 43 hospitals and nearly 250 clinics in nine states.

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