ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Redfield land sale awaits a final OK by Legislature

PIERRE -- The proposal to sell 132 acres of property at the South Dakota Developmental Center campus at Redfield cleared the state Senate on Thursday. But a Senate amendment means the legislation must return to the state House of Representatives ...

PIERRE - The proposal to sell 132 acres of property at the South Dakota Developmental Center campus at Redfield cleared the state Senate on Thursday. But a Senate amendment means the legislation must return to the state House of Representatives for final approval.

Sen. Larry Tidemann, R-Brookings, said half of the proceeds would be put in a permanent trust fund that benefits the center while the other half, minus expenses, would be placed in state government's general fund.

Tidemann said the sale would reduce expenses for the center, put land back on the property tax roll and increase the investment principal in the trust fund.

The sale proceeds would offset costs for the sale, such as appraisal and advertising, and pay for demolition work.

The Senate vote was 35-0. Because of a Senate Appropriations Committee amendment, the bill now returns to the House for a decision whether to agree with the Senate version. The House had voted 67-0 for its version Feb. 10.

ADVERTISEMENT

BANK BATTLE: The state House of Representatives gave final approval Thursday to an important change in South Dakota's banking tax laws.

Banks would be allowed 120 days to notify the state Department of Revenue of income adjustments that result from federal audits.

If a bank doesn't make a claim within the window, the bank can't bring a claim later in circuit court on the same matter, Rep. Timothy Johns, R-Lead, said. "I like it," he said.

Johns said the new law would apply to returns filed after Dec. 31, 2015.

The legislation, SB 52, now heads to Gov. Dennis Daugaard for his final review.

The change comes after the South Dakota Supreme Court decided last year that the state Department of Revenue acted correctly in rejecting Citibank's claim it was owed a refund after a federal audit reduced Citibank's taxable income.

State lawyers successfully argued that the claim came too late under South Dakota's then-current law.

Johns said the legislation would align South Dakota with other states in handling adjustments that result from federal audits.

ADVERTISEMENT

The House vote was 59-0. The bill previously received Senate approval 31-0. It now goes to the governor for his final review.

ANCHORS AWEIGH: Someone whistled the U.S. Naval Academy fight song Thursday afternoon in the state House chamber, as Rep. Roger Hunt rose to explain why $100,000 should be earmarked to help celebrate the commissioning of the USS South Dakota nuclear submarine.

Hunt, R-Brandon, said there was a heavy armed cruiser during the World War One period that was later renamed the USS Huron.

The second USS South Dakota, he said, was "a famous battleship in World War Two."

Hunt said he served for a time in the submarine service while he was in the U.S. Navy and said it is an honor for a submarine to carry the USS South Dakota name again.

He said it is an attack submarine that would carry Tomahawk missiles and "very sophisticated" torpedoes.

The schedule calls for the submarine to be launched in 2018 or possibly late 2017, according to Hunt.

He said the $100,000 would cover some of the seed payment for collectible souvenirs that would be associated with the submarine and to help pay for a U.S. Navy presentation in Sioux Falls.

ADVERTISEMENT

Representatives voted 60-1 for the measure, SB 114. The lone nay came from Rep. Elizabeth May, R-Kyle. The Senate previously passed the bill 35-0. It now goes to the governor for his review.

What To Read Next
Lawmakers have said it is likely only one is affordable at this time without cutting programs or adding other taxes or revenue streams
Members Only
Although Mitchell's rates would be increase, the proposed equitable rate structure could lessen the increased costs for residential customers' water and sewer bills.
“We see that when things happen in the coastal areas, a few years later, they start trending toward the Midwest,” said Rep. Ben Krohmer, serving his first term in the House.
“This is sensationalism at its finest, and it does not deserve to be heard in our state capitol,” Rep. Erin Healy, a Democrat and one of 10 votes against the bill in the 70-person chamber, said.