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Ravinia man arrested for possession of a controlled substance

WAGNER -- The South Dakota Highway Patrol made three arrests in Wagner on May 19 after pulling over a car without plates. One of those arrested was David Arrow Jr., 31, of Ravinia. Arrow is charged with possession of a controlled substance in sch...

WAGNER - The South Dakota Highway Patrol made three arrests in Wagner on May 19 after pulling over a car without plates.

One of those arrested was David Arrow Jr., 31, of Ravinia. Arrow is charged with possession of a controlled substance in schedule II and possession of drug paraphernalia.

According to a probable cause affidavit, while he was being questioned, Arrow was "very jerky and twitchy." Police found a glass pipe containing methamphetamine residue in the seat where Arrow had been sitting in the car, although Arrow originally denied that he had taken any sort of stimulant.

When he submitted to a urinalysis later, Arrow tested positive for methamphetamine and marijuana and then admitted to having smoked methamphetamine.

Two of the four people in the car with Arrow were also arrested. These were Curtis Huapapi, 46, who had been driving the car, and Susan Huapapi, 40, who had arrest warrants in Charles Mix County. Curtis Huapapi was arrested for driving under the influence and driving without a valid license.

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Possession of a controlled substance in schedules I or II is a Class 5 felony, which carries a maximum punishment of five years in prison and a fine of $10,000. Possession of drug paraphernalia is a Class 2 misdemeanor, punishable by up to 30 days in prison and a fine of up to $500.

Arrow is not currently scheduled to appear in court.

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