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Professional Excellence Award winners named at DWU

MITCHELL -- Janice Ford and Rick Johnson are the winners of the Professional Excellence Awards for the first quarter at Dakota Wesleyan University. Janice Ford, assistant professor of nursing at DWU's Huron campus, is the faculty winner. Nominati...

MITCHELL -- Janice Ford and Rick Johnson are the winners of the Professional Excellence Awards for the first quarter at Dakota Wesleyan University.

Janice Ford, assistant professor of nursing at DWU's Huron campus, is the faculty winner. Nominations for Ford hailed her accessibility and personal involvement in her students' education.

One nomination said, "She truly cares about giving us a quality education. She spends a lot of extra time helping us through things we don't understand and makes herself available 24 hours a day if we need anything. Janice has committed herself to making sure we make excellent nurses and that the quality of education is high."

Rick Johnson, supervisor of custodial services, is the staff winner. Johnson's positive, can-do attitude and willingness to go above and beyond earned him this award.

"Rick makes every person that comes to this campus feel welcome," states one nomination. "He always finds a way to make things happen. Rick and the maintenance staff put in a lot of hours making sure that everything is ready to go for all the events that we host here on campus. He may need to be here late at night or early in the morning, but he does his job with a smile and his great attitude!"

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The Professional Excellence Award is given three times a year to a faculty and staff member. The quarterly winners are then considered for the year-end awards for faculty and staff.

Winners are given campus recognition and a gift certificate. The award recognizes employees for "outstanding service, for exemplary commitment to the university and for making a difference in the lives of students."

The DWU Employee Recognition Committee selects the quarterly winners from nominations submitted by faculty, staff members and students.

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