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Plenty of water in Salem pool

SALEM -- What water shortage? While most Salem residents did all they could to conserve water during a shortage Wednesday caused by a malfunction at the city's water treatment plant, there was plenty to go around at the city's newly reopened publ...

Salem pool
Lifeguards Matt Giesler and Erin Eickman retrieve a pool vacuum from the bottom of Salem's public swimming pool Tuesday evening. The machine was used to clean the pool before the facility was reopened to the public on Wednesday. (Chris Mueller/Republic)

SALEM -- What water shortage?

While most Salem residents did all they could to conserve water during a shortage Wednesday caused by a malfunction at the city's water treatment plant, there was plenty to go around at the city's newly reopened public pool.

The pool had been closed since Sunday because its water pump, which circulates the pool's water through a filter, stopped working. Once a replacement was shipped into the city, Bill Selland, the city's water and sewer superintendent, installed the new pump Tuesday afternoon.

City employees said the reopening was not linked to the water shortage.

The pool did not need to be drained during the installation, but a larger-than-normal amount of chlorine was added to the pool to rid it of any contaminants that may have built up while the pump was out of service, said head lifeguard Steph Heumiller.

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The pool reopened on Wednesday, and with the National Weather Service forecasting highs in the 90s for the city through at least next Tuesday, it seems the timing couldn't have been better.

"It's nice that we have a place for the kids to swim on a pretty hot day," said lifeguard Erin Eickman. "But it's a pretty hot day just sitting there."

By Wednesday afternoon, nearly a dozen bikes sat on the lawn in front of the pool and a row of cars was parked on a nearby street as locals sought relief from the sweltering heat of the day. Barring any further malfunctions, Salem's pool is open from 1 to 5 p.m. and 6:30 to 9 p.m. every day through the end of summer.

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