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Man charged with breaking into vehicles in Mitchell

A Corsica man was arrested for breaking into cars outside a Mitchell business two weeks after being sentenced for a separate burglary conviction. According to the Mitchell Department of Public Safety, employees at a business in the 300 block of E...

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Police lights. (Republic file photo)

A Corsica man was arrested for breaking into cars outside a Mitchell business two weeks after being sentenced for a separate burglary conviction.

According to the Mitchell Department of Public Safety, employees at a business in the 300 block of East Havens Avenue contacted police at 5:59 p.m. on Monday after reportedly seeing 31-year-old Dee Jay Ring going through two vehicles in the parking lot they knew did not belong to him.

Ring was still at the scene when police responded. No damage was done to either of the vehicles involved, and the items taken from the vehicles were recovered.

Ring was given a suspended five-year prison sentence on May 22 in Davison County after being convicted of third-degree burglary. He was also convicted of resisting arrest on that date and was given a sentence equivalent to the 22 days he had already served in jail for that charge.

For Monday's incident, Ring is charged with two counts of criminal entry of a motor vehicle, a Class 1 misdemeanor punishable by up to a year in jail on each count.

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As of Tuesday morning, Ring remained in custody at the Davison County Jail.

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