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Longest tenured Rapid City employee to retire this week

RAPID CITY (AP) -- The longest tenured Rapid City employee will retire Friday after more than 40 years of service. The Rapid City Journal reports water superintendent John Wagner began working for the city in August 1972, weeks after the flood th...

RAPID CITY (AP) - The longest tenured Rapid City employee will retire Friday after more than 40 years of service.

The Rapid City Journal reports water superintendent John Wagner began working for the city in August 1972, weeks after the flood that wiped out a large section of the city and killed more than 200 people.

Wagner's first job with the city was as a team worker on the city's utility crew. He says he felt good about contributing to the city's recovery after the flood by participating in the cleanup effort.

Wagner says his biggest accomplishment as a city employee was to be able to establish a water conservation program, especially after the drought that affected the city in the late 1980s. Rapid City today uses less water than it did two decades ago.

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