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Davison County felony court cases for Aug. 2

A roundup of Tuesday's felony court proceedings at the Davison County Public Safety Center courtroom

Davison County PSB.jpg
Front of the Davison County Public Safety County courtroom.
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MITCHELL — The following cases were among those heard Tuesday, Aug. 2, during a circuit court session at the Davison County Public Safety Center, with Judge Chris Giles presiding:

  • Charles Wilson, 60, of Mitchell, was sentenced to 15 years in prison with three years suspended for sexual contact with a minor under the age of 16, a Class 3 felony that carries a maximum sentence of up to 15 years in prison and a $30,000 fine. The victim Wilson had sexual contact with was 9 years old at the time of the incident. Deputy Davison County State’s Attorney Robert O’Keefe said Tuesday that the victim has been “making further disclosures” about the sexual incident with Wilson. Prior to imposing the prison sentence, Judge Chris Giles said Wilson’s comments of the incident “try to place blame” on the 9-year-old victim. Wilson’s attorney, Doug Pappendick, pointed to Wilson’s health issues, bad hearing and poor eyesight as reasons Wilson would not benefit from a prison sentence. He received credit for serving 161 days in jail.
  • Allen Thomson, 29, of Mitchell, had an arraignment hearing set for Aug. 30 for possession of a controlled substance, a Class 5 felony, distribution and possession of marijuana in the amount of 1 ounces or less with the intent to distribute, a Class 6 felony and possession of marijuana in the amount of 1 ounces or less. Thomson could face up to seven years in prison, if convicted on all charges.
  • Jennifer Jackson, 31, of Mitchell, pleaded not guilty to three counts of violating a protection order and the act to permit threatening or harassing phone calls, all class 1 misdemeanors. An arrest affidavit alleges Jackson violated a protection order with a significant other and changed the man’s passwords to his online accounts, including his work account. She is schedule to face a jury trial in mid-October unless she changes her plea prior to the trial.
  • Matthew Messer, 40, of Mitchell, was sentenced to 10 years in prison with five years suspended for two counts of possession of a controlled substance (meth), both Class 5 felonies that carries a maximum sentence of up to five years in prison and a $10,000 fine. He received credit for serving over 100 days in jail.
  • Pete Ringingshield, 39, of Mitchell, pleaded not guilty to four counts of simple assault against a law officer, each Class 6 felonies that carry a maximum sentence of up to two years in prison and a $4,000 fine. He will face a jury trial in mid-October unless he changes his plea prior to the trial.
  • Alexander Heisinger, 29, of Mitchell, was sentenced to five years in prison with two years suspended for a fourth-offense Driving Under the Influence (DUI) charge, a Class 5 felony that carries a maximum sentence of up to five years in prison. Heisinger’s blood alcohol level at the time of his arrest was .383, which Judge Giles said was alarming. He previously completed James Valley DUI Court prior to his latest DUI. He received credit for serving 19 days in jail.
  • Amber Gentapanan, 24, of Mitchell, was sentenced to five years in prison with two years suspended for possession of a controlled substance, a Class 5 felony that carries a maximum sentence of up to five years in prison and a $10,000 fine.
  • Heaven Miller, 33, of Mitchell, pleaded guilty to possession of a controlled substance (meth), a Class 5 felony that carries a maximum sentence of up to five years in prison and a $10,000 fine. She was sentenced to five years in prison with five years suspended. Miller was also ordered to serve two years of probation. She received credit for serving 101 days in jail. Miller is also facing a charge in another county.
  • Clarence Stands, 30, of Mitchell, pleaded not guilty to possession of a controlled substance (meth), a Class 5 felony that carries a maximum sentence of up to five years in prison and a $10,000 fine, possession of marijuana in the amount of 2 ounces or less and driving with a suspended license. He was granted a personal recognizance bond on Tuesday to allow his release from jail.
  • Antoine Cournoyer, 23, of Mitchell, pleaded guilty to third-degree burglary, a Class 5 felony that carries a maximum sentence of up to five years in prison and a $10,000 fine. Cournoyer stole money from Discount Joe’s moped shop in downtown Mitchell after breaking into the store. According to Davison County state prosecuting attorneys, Cournoyer jumped through a window at a downtown apartment building as he fled from officers following the burglary. He was sentenced to five years in prison with five years suspended, along with two years of probation. Cournoyer was denied his request for a suspended imposition. He was ordered to pay roughly $1,600 in restitution fees from the burglary incident.
  • Garan Crader, 39,of Mitchell, pleaded not guilty to violating probation, domestic abuse simple assault, false imprisonment, aggravated eluding and interfering with emergency communications. Crader’s probation violation stemmed from a domestic dispute, which led him to flee. Deputy Davison County State’s Attorney Robert O’Keefe pointed to the high-speed chase Crader led officers on prior to his arrest as a reason he opposed any bond modification. His bond was reduced to $1,000 on Tuesday. He is scheduled to face a jury trial in October unless he changes his plea prior to the trial date.
  • Daniel Seiner, 37, of Mitchell, was granted a furlough to enter a treatment facility on Tuesday. He’s facing a probation violation charge.
  • Cante’ Bad Moccasin, 19, of Mitchell, admitted to violating probation. She’s been serving probation for possession of a controlled substance (meth). Her probation violation stems from being arrested for drinking alcohol underage while on probation. Bad Moccasin’s blood alcohol level was .308 when she was arrested. She was granted a furlough to enter a treatment facility in Sioux Falls.
  • James Johnson, 44, of Mitchell, pleaded not guilty to manufacturing, distributing and possessing three or more controlled substances, two counts of keeping a place for use or sale of a controlled substance, six counts of possession of a controlled substance, two counts of possession of marijuana in the amount of 2 ounces or less and a seat belt violation. Johnson is facing up to 35 years in prison and a $70,000 fine, if convicted of all charges. Davison County State’s Attorney Jim Miskimins said there was “plenty of evidence” to show Johnson was using his residence to distribute drugs, including scales. His bond modification request was denied Tuesday.
  • Karla Bridger, 58, of Mitchell, pleaded guilty to a third-offense DUI, a Class 6 felony that carries a maximum sentence of up to two years in prison and a $4,000 fine. She is scheduled to be sentenced on Sept. 13. Bridger was granted a PR bond Tuesday to allow her release from jail.
Sam Fosness joined the Mitchell Republic in May 2018. He was raised in Mitchell, S.D., and graduated from Mitchell High School. He continued his education at the University of South Dakota in Vermillion, where he graduated in 2020 with a bachelor’s degree in journalism and a minor in English. During his time in college, Fosness worked as a news and sports reporter for The Volante newspaper.
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