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Lighting upgrades coming to the Davison County Courthouse

Let there be better light at the Davison County Courthouse. The Davison County Commission decided Tuesday to go with the higher cost option to replace the lights in the Davison County Courthouse's third floor courtroom. But with energy savings an...

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Let there be better light at the Davison County Courthouse.

The Davison County Commission decided Tuesday to go with the higher cost option to replace the lights in the Davison County Courthouse's third floor courtroom. But with energy savings and longer lasting LED bulbs replacing the old style metal halide bulbs, Director of Physical Plants Mark Ruml's initial recommendation suggests the more expensive bulbs will pay for themselves.

The board, minus absent Commissioner Kim Weitala, approved a $2,358 purchase through Mitchell-based TK Electric, though Muth Electric's bid only came in $22 higher. To replace the metal halide bulbs would have cost $468, but Ruml said those bulbs become 70 percent less bright three years after they are installed.

When Ruml first pitched the replacement last week, he was asked to speak with courtroom workers to see if they had any suggestions contrary to his recommendation. But the board stuck with the original proposal, and Commissioner Randy Reider said he was fine with either bid considering how close they were.

"With those prices that close, I wouldn't care which one we went through, if you had one that could do it before the other or if one's more familiar with the building and all that stuff," Reider said. "And if that's all a toss-up, let's save $22."

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Commission Chair Brenda Bode also suggested the lights will need to be replaced at one point or another.

"And I'd guess we're not going to be closing the courtroom anytime soon," Bode said.

Other business

In other business, the commission:

• Acknowledged former Davison County Commissioner Bernie Schmucker, who died last week.

• During citizen input, Hunt Safe instructor Jay Larson expressed his appreciation to the commission for its continued support of South Dakota Game, Fish & Parks by allowing it to use the Davison County Fairgrounds site for hunting safety.

• Awarded various highway project and supply bids as presented by Highway Superintendent Rusty Weinberg, approved timesheets and bills, approved abatements, authorized GF&P use of the Davison County Fairgrounds, appointed Craig Bennett to the Safety Committee, signed an interpreter agreement for an upcoming trial for someone who doesn't speak English and signed the annual James Valley Drug Task Force agreement.

• Approved a $6,000 donation to Avera Health for the equipment it furnished in the Davison County Fairgrounds.

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• Heard the quarterly nurse's report, which focused on the wide spread of influenza throughout South Dakota this season.

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