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Lentsch leaving post as South Dakota Agriculture Secretary

PIERRE (AP) -- South Dakota Agriculture Secretary Lucas Lentsch says he'll leave his post next month for an opportunity in the private sector. [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2341442","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image...

PIERRE (AP) - South Dakota Agriculture Secretary Lucas Lentsch says he'll leave his post next month for an opportunity in the private sector.
Lentsch has served as secretary of the South Dakota Department of Agriculture since April 2013. He previously served as the department's director of agricultural development. Lentsch says he is looking forward to taking on a challenging leadership role in the ag sector as well as being more engaged in his family cattle operation. He's originally from Marshall County. Gov. Dennis Daugaard praised Lentsch for his service. Daugaard says Lentsch has been instrumental in reorganizing the department to be more reflective of the dynamic agriculture industry it serves. Daugaard and his leadership team are beginning a search for Lentsch's replacement immediately.PIERRE (AP) - South Dakota Agriculture Secretary Lucas Lentsch says he'll leave his post next month for an opportunity in the private sector.
Lentsch has served as secretary of the South Dakota Department of Agriculture since April 2013. He previously served as the department's director of agricultural development.Lentsch says he is looking forward to taking on a challenging leadership role in the ag sector as well as being more engaged in his family cattle operation. He's originally from Marshall County.Gov. Dennis Daugaard praised Lentsch for his service. Daugaard says Lentsch has been instrumental in reorganizing the department to be more reflective of the dynamic agriculture industry it serves.Daugaard and his leadership team are beginning a search for Lentsch's replacement immediately.

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