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Legislators decide vetoes on Tuesday

PIERRE--South Dakota legislators return Tuesday for the final time of the 2016 session to handle five vetoes issued by the governor. The governor suggested corrections and clarifications to two pieces of legislation through what are known as styl...

PIERRE-South Dakota legislators return Tuesday for the final time of the 2016 session to handle five vetoes issued by the governor.

The governor suggested corrections and clarifications to two pieces of legislation through what are known as style and form vetoes.

Those two bills deal with municipal government. The prime sponsor of both is Sen. Scott Fiegen, R-Dell Rapids.

SB 64 makes changes regarding the voting power of an alderman.

SB 65 would revise the process of petitioning for a municipal recall election.

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Legislators will vote whether to accept the governor's proposed changes.

On the three full vetoes, lawmakers would decide whether the measures should become law regardless of the governor's objections.

A two-thirds majority is necessary in each of the Senate and the House of Representatives for an override to succeed.

SB 96 proposed to increase the daily expense reimbursement for members of the state Board of Pardons and Paroles. The prime sponsor is Sen. Craig Tieszen, R-Rapid City.

In his veto message, Gov. Dennis Daugaard said the board members would need to pay income tax for the reimbursement and the amount wouldn't be adjustable in case of higher lodging rates.

SB 100 would provide a tax incentive for some broadband upgrade projects. Sen. Corey Brown, R-Gettysburg, is the prime sponsor.

Daugaard, in his veto letter, said he didn't think the legislation is necessary for the broadband investments to continue.

SB 136 would provide a tax break for grass strips planted between crop fields and waterway. Up to 50 feet of grass could be taxed at the non-cropland rate even if the soil was rated for crops. Sen. Jim Peterson, D-Revillo, is the prime sponsor.

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Daugaard said, in his veto message, that there would be a shift of tax burden to other agricultural property. He also said there would be difficulties in determining when waterways would qualify.

The Senate is scheduled to start at 10 a.m. Tuesday. The House set its start for 11 a.m.

The Senate will start with all five vetoes. If the Senate overrides any of the full vetoes, the legislation would proceed to the House for its consideration.

None of the bills that received full vetoes from the governor met more than a handful of nays in either chamber.

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