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LEGISLATIVE ROUNDUP: Senator continues push for State-Tribal meeting

PIERRE -- There is sufficient support from some South Dakota legislators to hold a Thursday meeting of the State-Tribal Relations Committee that could coordinate with the State of the Tribes speech that afternoon.

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South Dakota State Capitol

PIERRE - There is sufficient support from some South Dakota legislators to hold a Thursday meeting of the State-Tribal Relations Committee that could coordinate with the State of the Tribes speech that afternoon.

Sen. Stace Nelson, R-Fulton, emailed Legislative Research Council Director Jason Hancock saying at least six of the 10 lawmakers on the House-Senate panel favor the meeting.

Nelson said the supporters from the House are Liz May, R-Kyle; Steve Livermont, R-Martin; and John Lake, R-Gettysburg. From the Senate he listed Lance Russell, R-Hot Springs; Phil Jensen, R-Rapid City; and himself.

Resistant to May's idea was Sen. Troy Heinert, D-Mission, the committee's chairman.

Changing sides

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Former lawmaker Corey Brown was in the Capitol for the governor's State of the State speech officially starting the 2018 session Tuesday.

Brown wore the legislative-lobbyist badge for Sanford Health.

He retired as a legislator in 2016 after reaching the voter-imposed maximum of four consecutive Senate elections and deciding against seeking a House seat.

The U.S. Navy aviator served in a series of increasingly important roles during those eight years, as Senate chairman of the appropriations committee, Senate president pro tem (the chamber's top senator) and finally as Senate Republican leader.

Graceful change

House members officially chose Sandy Zinter as their new chief clerk Tuesday.

Zinter, who retired from the executive branch after serving in Cabinet offices for several governors, is married to Supreme Court Justice Steven Zinter.

She succeeds Arlene Kvislen, who attended the transition Tuesday.

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House members honored Kvislen for 20 years of service.

Spotted

A former lawmaker who came to the Capitol Tuesday was JoAnn Morford. She served in the Senate from 1991 through 1998 as a Democrat from Wessington Springs in Jerauld County.

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