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L.B. Williams Elementary students win National Good Deed Award

Service, not self. Students of Stacy Morgan's multiage third- and fourth-grade class at L.B. Williams Elementary School in Mitchell put others before themselves and were honored with the National Good Deed Award, presented by the American Legion ...

Third- and Fourth-grade students at L.B. Williams Elementary focus on their next project during a presentation by their teacher Stacy Morgan recently. The class was honored with the National Good Deed Award presented by the American Legion Auxiliary. (Sheila Slater /Republic)
Third- and Fourth-grade students at L.B. Williams Elementary focus on their next project during a presentation by their teacher Stacy Morgan recently. The class was honored with the National Good Deed Award presented by the American Legion Auxiliary. (Sheila Slater /Republic)

Service, not self.

Students of Stacy Morgan's multiage third- and fourth-grade class at L.B. Williams Elementary School in Mitchell put others before themselves and were honored with the National Good Deed Award, presented by the American Legion Auxiliary, recently.

The children had been reading about people doing good things for the community in newspapers and asked their teacher if they could join in and do a good deed after deciding to give away their winnings from a school raffle.

"It was around Christmas time and we felt that children are focused on a lot during that time," student Ivory Fenski said. "We wanted to do something for the elderly."

The class won $465 at a raffle in November and wanted to pass on the money to people who needed it more than they did.

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"Instead of going to a movie or ice skating, we decided to donate that money for The Hunger Tree at James Valley Community Center," student Dayton Adams said.

"We wanted to donate our money to The Hunger Tree so four people could have a month's worth of free food," student Mason Bartscher said.

The kids visited the senior group at the community center, played board games and pool with them and sang a birthday song for one of the seniors, bringing her to tears.

The kindness snowballed at the school campus and many family members, teachers and friends pulled together to donate toward the JVCC Hunger Tree, adding about $7,000 to the cause.

"Because others started giving as well, I feel like all of us felt really honored," student Charlie Musick said. "Our entire class was happy. Mrs. Morgan also posted something on Facebook and we started getting really good replies."

The initial visit to the senior center has led to blossoming friendships between young and old; and all the students agreed, it feels good to give time to the seniors and communicating with the elderly brought them the most fun.

Sharon Broghammer is the children and youth chairman at the Mitchell American Legion Auxiliary Unit. Broghammer caught wind of the students' good deeds and was the person who nominated the class for the national award.

In a letter to the students, National Children and Youth Chairman of the American Legion Auxiliary Vickie Koutz noted their efforts and "making a difference in your community." It later went on to say, "This award was created in 2002 by one of the American Legion Auxiliary committees and the National Children and Youth Committee. We use these opportunities of these awards to be able to show your deed(s) as an example for your friends, classmates, and family to do selfless acts in their everyday lives, too."

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