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Kriese named interim Dakota Wesleyan University president

DWU's Board of Trustees will continue to conduct a nationwide search for the university's 21st president.

Kriese, Theresa.jpg
Theresa Kriese

Theresa Kriese has been appointed the interim president for Dakota Wesleyan University, the school announced Monday.

Kriese has served in several roles for DWU since 2008, including most recently the executive vice president. The Mitchell resident takes over following the resignation of Amy Novak, who left the private college to take the same role at St. Ambrose University in Davenport, Iowa.

DWU's Board of Trustees will continue to conduct a nationwide search for the university's 21st president.

In a press release, Kriese said she plans to “work hard to build on the momentum generated by Amy Novak and her team to position the university in a strong and healthy place for the next president. I look forward to working with the search committee to find the best candidate to lead DWU in the years to come.”

Kriese, who has extensive knowledge in academics, has served as DWU executive vice president since 2013. She has also worked as DWU's vice president for business and advancement and as vice president for business and finance. Prior to working at Wesleyan, she was vice president of administrative services for then-Mitchell Technical Institute from 1994 to 2007. She also served two terms on the Mitchell Board of Education, the second as its president.

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“We are pleased to appoint Theresa as the interim president as we embark on the search for DWU’s next leader," DWU Board of Trustees President Doug Powers said in a press release. "Theresa has the knowledge and ability to ensure that things continue to run smoothly, and we have confidence that she will direct university operations using her exceptional management skills, energy and enthusiasm.”

No timeline was given as when the college expects to name its next full-time president.

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