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Habitat for Humanity brings another new home to Mitchell

The groundbreaking ceremony for a new home on 1212 S. Kimball St. for a new home built by the Mitchell Regional Habitat for Humanity (MRHFH) turned into a mud-breaking ceremony due to the heavy rains.

The groundbreaking ceremony for a new home on 1212 S. Kimball St. for a new home built by the Mitchell Regional Habitat for Humanity (MRHFH) turned into a mud-breaking ceremony due to the heavy rains.

But that could not dampen the excitement felt among the participants. Especially for Jean Hale, a grandmother of three and this year's candidate for the MRHFH new homeowner program. Hale was selected from a small group of applicants who met certain income levels but were not able to qualify for a traditional home mortgage loan. The board of MRHFH accepted and recognized Hale as an outstanding and rewarding candidate.

"We are excited for Jean and look forward to working with her," said Bonnie Hansen, president of the board at MRHFH. "It's not a give-away program, so the candidates do have to be able to pay their mortgage back. We provide them with a 30-year no-interest loan and provide a lot of counseling and education for the applicants. If they do not qualify the first time, we encourage them to not give up and try again."

Hale is looking forward to moving into a new and safer home for her three granddaughters: Selena, 11; Dominique, 7; and Amelie, 3. The girls have already decided on the colors for their rooms and decorations.

Hale was informed in April that she was chosen for the program.

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"It was strange. I prayed the night before and said, 'God, if you think we should have this new house, let us get it.' The next day Debbie from Habitat for Humanity called and said we were the ones chosen," Hale said. "We live in such an old house and this new one will be so nice."

Before the big move in day, the Hale family will work on completing 200-400 hours of "sweat equity," a phrase that refers to an ownership interest created by the sweat of a person's labor. The candidates can either work for the MRHFH or any other charitable organization in the region.

MRHFH has built or repaired more than 25 homes in Davison and Hanson counties in cooperation with volunteers, businesses, and qualified partner families since 2001.

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