ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

GRAVES: Wrong to not tell board, but it was no cover-up

I write in order to take exception to an article that appeared in The Daily Republic on May 24 and the staff editorial that appeared on May 25. In both cases, statements were made to the effect that I defended my inaction of not telling the schoo...

I write in order to take exception to an article that appeared in The Daily Republic on May 24 and the staff editorial that appeared on May 25. In both cases, statements were made to the effect that I defended my inaction of not telling the school board of the boys' basketball program probationary status assigned by the South Dakota High School Activities Association. The intended implication is that I was attempting to cover-up the probation or coach Munsen's rule violation.

Neither is true.

In fact, once the violation was reported to Activities Director Geoff Gross on April 16, the same day as the violation, he met with me telephonically and in person, we determined after a simple investigation that the violation had occurred and we self-reported to the SDHSAA.

Had I intended a cover-up, we would have not self-reported and, if accused, would have searched for some reason that it was not truly a violation. (Even now, some are suggested that is precisely what we should have done.)

Instead, we owned up to what had occurred and accepted the consequences for it on April 19 when the SDHSAA, in a public meeting with widely circulated minutes, ruled that we had indeed violated the rule.

ADVERTISEMENT

It was at this point that I made an error: I did not inform the school board. Frankly, I forgot to do so. It is my obligation not to forget such things so the reason for my inaction has no redeeming value.

I blew it.

I made this statement to the school board at a public meeting on Monday of this week. I stated three times that I should have reported this information to the board earlier and my failure to do so was an error on my part. I also stated -- once -- that no rule was violated by my not reporting it to the board. I made this statement because some information through the Department of Education is legally required to be reported to the board or board president and not doing so can create a second violation. This was not one of those cases.

My statement that no requirement existed to report to the board was thus not a defense of my inaction; nor was it intended to be. So let me say it one more time. By not telling the board of the probationary status of the boys basketball team, I was in error, for which I have no excuse.

Related Topics: EDUCATION
What To Read Next
Throughout the county party election season, stretching from mid-November to the end of January, delegates have succeeded in changing the makeup of key county parties, like Minnehaha and Pennington.
Members Only
“In our industry there aren’t a lot of young people in it. I like the fact that there are a lot of young people in agriculture here,” he said of the Mitchell area.
Members Only
After the departure of longtime superintendent Marje Kaiser and the hiring of Dan Trefz, who recently resigned, advocates say the specialty school needs help from lawmakers to reach its past heights.
Over the past year, the city has been mulling over bringing a secondary water source to Mitchell – a move Mayor Bob Everson said is aimed at positioning the city to grow.