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'God of Carnage' to start Friday at Pepsi-Cola Theatre

Audiences can see the best and worst of humanity in "God of Carnage" this weekend. The production, a partnership between the Dakota Wesleyan University theater department and the Mitchell Area Community Theatre, starts Friday at the Pepsi Cola Th...

Audiences can see the best and worst of humanity in "God of Carnage" this weekend.

The production, a partnership between the Dakota Wesleyan University theater department and the Mitchell Area Community Theatre, starts Friday at the Pepsi Cola Theatre.

"God of Carnage" is about two sets of parents who come together for a meeting after their 11-year-old boys get into an altercation on the playground.

The production, written by Yasmina Reza, follows the parents' discussion that, at first, begins diplomatically and then tension rises.

Dan Miller, director of "God of Carnage" and director of theater at DWU, said the play looks at how communication and decorum can quickly break down.

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"This is going to be very different for Mitchell audiences," he said. "This is really considered a piece of art rather than theater ... It has a really strong social message."

The production will last 1 hour and 15 minutes, Miller said, and no intermission.

The play will begin at 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, with a 2 p.m. show Sunday. On Oct. 7-8, the show will be at 7:30 p.m. with a 2 p.m. show on Sunday, Oct. 9.

According to Megan Reimnitz, the managing director of the ACT, tickets will cost between $13 and $15 depending on seating. Tickets can be purchased on the ACT's website or at the box office.

The production is a dark comedy and some uncomfortable subject matter, Reimnitz said, but still relatable to many parents.

"It's one of those plays that sticks with you your whole life," she said.

The cast is made up of four members: Alan Raleigh played by Ian Hyde, Annette Raleigh played by Alaina Bertsch, James Van Oort as Michael Novak, and Heather Adams as Veronica Novak.

Miller said Mitchell has not seen anything like this production on stage, and the audiences will most likely have mixed reviews.

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"Some people will love it and some people will hate it. Some people will go, 'What the heck did I just see?' " Miller said. " ... Theater is not supposed to be laid out in front of you. It's supposed to make you think about yourself and the world you live in."

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